PAEDIATRIC PHYSIOTHERAPY

LiteGait Therapy

Therasuit Method Intensive Program

Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES)

Constraint – Induced Movement Therapy

Gait Analysis

Galileo Mechanical Vibration

Physiotherapy for children is a clinical category of physiotherapy. It aims to improve a child’s motor capabilities, taking into account normal maturation and development, by using various methods of motor learning, in order to:

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Achieve motor learning (e.g. operational skills, walking, etc.)

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Provide ways of adapting to everyday life (e.g. appropriate footwear, use of special equipment, etc.)

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Educate children and parents on how to the child can achieve maximum independence and participation in society (e.g. school, etc.)

All this is achieved through a personalized treatment programme that always has play as a driving force.

To set therapeutic goals and organize the appropriate treatment plan, the physical therapist initially assesses the child’s functional difficulties based on valid assessment criteria and in line with the child’s medical history and their social history as explained by the parents. Decisions are always made with the consent of the parents and in line with the priorities shaped by the child’s general developmental needs which are met by the interdisciplinary team of therapists. Physiotherapy interventions may be necessary from infancy for a wide range of disorders which result in neurodevelopmental, musculoskeletal and cardiorespiratory problems.

There is often a need for early intervention to reinforce and/or teach skills that children master naturally during typical development. Some examples of common concerns that parents may have include:

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Premature babies (up to 36 weeks) or underweight infants (up to 1500g)

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Newborns with difficulties in turning their head

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Infants with difficulties either in movement or in maintaining balance in certain positions

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Infants and children who regularly walk on tiptoe

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Children who have difficulty with coordination or balance and who fall frequently

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Children with poor posture, who complain of frequent muscle pain

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Children who have sports or other injuries.

More specifically, paediatric physiotherapy intervention can be helpful for disorders such as:

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Cerebral Palsy (hemiplegia, diplegia, quadriplegia)

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Spinal Cord Injuries

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Traumatic brain injury

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Motor retardation

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Torticollis

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Muscle tone disorders / hypotonia / hypertonia / dystonia

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Disorders of coordination, balance

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Muscle spasms

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Spina bifida

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Syndromes (Downs, Rett, Angelmann etc.)

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Varus or valgus ankle joints

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Kyphosis / scoliosis / lordosis

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Congenital hip dislocation

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Brachial plexus paresis

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Rheumatoid arthritis

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Cystic fibrosis

The child’s physical therapist can help by:

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Helping the child learn movement patterns, such as walking

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Improving range of motion, elasticity

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Strengthening muscle work and improving overall effective production of muscle work (endurance, strength and power)

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Inhibiting dysfunctional pathological patterns

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Improving symmetry

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Strengthening optimal loading of the limbs

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Improving Balance and coordination

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Improving the child’s motor repertoire and its quality